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NCAA Softens Stand, Votes to Compensate College Athletes

The continuous push for college athletes’ compensation by state and federal lawmakers has finally paid off. On Tuesday, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Board of Governors voted unanimously to allow student-athletes to receive compensation for the use of their likeness or name.

The new decision will make updates to relevant bylaws and policies and applies to all the NCAA’s three divisions. It comes into effect with a separate set of principles and guidelines.

The changes were recommended by the NCAA Board of Governors Federal and State Legislation Working Group including presidents, commissioners, athletics directors, administrators and student-athletes.

“We must embrace change to provide the best possible experience for college athletes,” said Michael V. Drake, chair of the board.

“Additional flexibility in this area can and must continue to support college sports as a part of higher education. This modernization for the future is a natural extension of the numerous steps NCAA members have taken in recent years to improve support for student-athletes, including full cost of attendance and guaranteed scholarships.”

Last month, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed Senate Bill 206, or The Fair Pay to Play Act, allowing college athletes to sign sponsorship deals and receive compensation.

 

The NCAA had long maintained that such bills are “harmful” and “unconstitutional” saying that it would erase the line dividing college and professional athletics and throw to wind the fairness that is associated with the college sports.

NCAA Board of Governors had written a letter to Gov. Newsom raising the concern that the bill would erase the line dividing college and professional athletics and throw to wind the fairness that is associated with the college sports.

The association further said that it is against paying the college athletes to play and not against allowing them to use their name, image, and likeness.

Immediately after the bill was signed, the lawmakers from many states including Illinois, Florida, South Carolina and New York took the lead to introduce similar bills.

Why Aren’t College Athletes Paid?

 

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