The College Post
The College Post -- Covering Higher Education in America

How to Make The Most of Your Time at Home During the Pandemic

With the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19 prompting officials at all levels of government to impose restrictions on businesses, schools, and other aspects of our everyday lives, many are coming to terms with a new reality and a lot more time at home than normal as a result.

While you’re stuck indoors during this pandemic, there are plenty of ways to make the transition as seamless as possible that will hopefully help you from going stir crazy. 

 

Catch Up on Some Much Needed Sleep

Now that you’re taking classes or working from home, you might be realizing just how much time your commute takes up in your day. Now that your commute is no longer a part of the equation, you can take more time to work on your beauty sleep and start your day with renewed energy.

Not only do you not have to commute anymore, but you can also start working while looking like you literally just got out of bed. Getting dressed for work while you work from home can help to get you into a work-like headspace, but if you’re confident in your ability to stay productive and on task, why not do all that serious grinding in the comfort of your PJ’s.

Another benefit of that extra shut-eye and working in your sleeping clothes is that you might be able to finally break your addiction to your morning coffee. Of course you might love your coffee and not want to quit. Alternatively, it’s entirely possible that you relapse and start your coffee habit again when you go back to work, but maybe by then you won’t need to use coffee as a crutch to get through the day anymore, and that could be pretty neat.

Get Some Food Delivered

Service sector businesses are among the hardest hit by the COVID-19 outbreak, as more people stay at home and avoid going to bars and restaurants. One way that you can help to brunt the economic impact of the virus is to support your local businesses and get some food delivered from your favorite restaurant.

You can even practice social distancing by having your delivery driver leave your order by your door. In this regard it helps to use apps like Postmates or DoorDash so you don’t have to hand cash to your driver.

Just be sure to keep in mind that delivery drivers are putting themselves at risk by going to work and delivering food during this outbreak, so be sure to leave them a nice tip as a sign of your appreciation. 

Read Books, Binge Shows, Frag Noobs

If you’re behind on your reading list, you have a backlog of video games you’ve been meaning to get to, or there’s a show on your favorite streaming service you’ve been dying to watch, there’s no better time than a pandemic to make use of your abundance of inside time by indulging in the vast sea of media that’s available at our fingertips. 

Reading is a great way to pass the time and it has plenty of mental and emotional benefits too like maintaining your mental acuity and helping you to relax. There is a lot you can learn from reading a few books, so learn a few factoids and impress your colleagues with your new knowledge next time you’re back at work.

There is plenty of programming available on streaming services for people of all tastes to entertain themselves from the hot new Netflix reality series Love is Blind if you’re looking for some mindless fun to Westworld on HBO if you’re looking for something a bit more stimulating. Now could also be a great time to try a free trial of a streaming service you may have been curious about and making the absolute most of it.

Since you probably won’t be spending as much time with your friends in person, a good way to connect with them while you wait out COVID-19 could be through some online gaming. Committing heinous acts of violence in a virtual world with friends can be almost as fun and gratifying as a night on the town and it can be a great bonding experience. There are plenty of games on offer that you can play by yourself too if that’s more your speed. 

Start Learning a New Skill

Another thing you can do to keep busy while you’re hunkered down at home is do a bit of work on yourself. Not only will passing the time by learning a new skill help to keep you sane while you’re cooped up at home, but it could help you in your daily life once you’re able to go back into your normal routine. 

There are plenty of apps available for your smartphone, like Duolingo or Babbel which you can use to start practicing a new language and other apps like Yousician, even help you to learn instruments like guitar and ukulele. If apps aren’t your style, you can always learn something by watching some how-to videos on youtube, of which there are a virtually endless supply.

If you’ve been stocking up at your local grocery store to ensure you’re well enough supplied to stay at home for an extended period, you could also look up some recipes online and try to learn how to make some new dishes. That way, when you no longer have to practice social distancing, you can invite some family and friends over for dinner and impress them with your newfound cooking abilities.

Walk Your Dog More …While Practicing Social Distancing!


If you, like many people, are a dog owner, maybe your busy life has kept you from spending as much quality time with your pup as they might like. Now that you’re stuck at home, your doggo is surely thrilled to have so much extra time with you and you’re likely starved for a bit of fresh air, so why not take advantage of it while you can and take them on some adventurous walks?

Not only does walking your pupper present an opportunity for both of you to get some exercise, but you can be a good citizen and practice social distancing while you do it. Just keep your distance from other pedestrians, avoid crowded areas, and you can enjoy your walk with fido without worry of spreading or contracting COVID-19. 

Of course, your ability to keep your distance from others will vary depending on the population density of your neighborhood, so that’s something to keep in mind as well. 

How College Professors are Adjusting to Teleteaching Amid Virus Shutdowns